Jeff Lehman

Double, Pass, or Bid On?

A recent matchpoint session at the local club duplicate presented an extraordinarily high number of “double, pass, or bid on” competitive bidding decisions.  With no promise that what worked best at the table is best in general, try your choices on the following hands.

Board 4.

W
West
1092
J93
AK107
K64

 

W
West
N
North
E
East
S
South
Pass
1
4
4
?
 
 
 

 

Your call?

 

Board 5. 

W
West
AKJ7
AK52
632
J10
W
West
N
North
E
East
S
South
Pass
Pass
1
Dbl
2
2
Pass
?
 
 
 

 

Your call?

 

Board 6. 

W
North
KQ105
KQ83
J54
97
W
West
N
North
E
East
S
South
Pass
1
Dbl
1
2
Dbl1
Pass
32
Pass
Pass
?
 
 
 
(1) see text
(2) see text

The auction requires a lot of explanation.  First of all, South’s double was alerted and described by North as showing four spades.  Second of all, North had first bid an insufficient 2.  When the director was called and explained the options, North changed his call to 3.  Your call?

There’s more.  After the auction is concluded,  South corrected the explanation of her double, saying that double was “Do Something Intelligent” … just about my least favorite agreement, because I believe that it is difficult for partner to do something intelligent when he has been given, basically, only “pass the blame” information, nothing about suit lengths and very little about hand strength.

Anyway, do you change your call should the director allow the bidding to rollback to you?

 

Board 11. 

W
West
3
J962
J975
AJ64
W
West
N
North
E
East
S
South
2
Pass
2
3
3
4
4
Pass
Pass
?
 
 
 

 

Your call?

 

Board 14. 

W
West
9
A763
AK73
9876
W
West
N
North
E
East
S
South
2
Pass
Pass
Dbl
Pass
3
?
 
 
 

 

Your call?

 

Board 20. 

W
West
Q4
Q109852
852
87
East
West
1
21
3
?
(1) weak, no further discussion

 

Finally, an uncontested auction.  Your call?

 

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Board 4.

Double was the winner (+500 for better than 90% of the mps), even though partner’s 4 call was lighter than anticipated.

 
4
Both
West
N
North
AQJ874
K6
Q65
92
 
W
West
1092
J93
AK107
K64
A
E
East
6
A1087542
J9
J87
 
S
South
K53
Q
8432
AQ1053
 

 

 

Board 5. 

Raising to 3 was the winner, as partner went on to 4 and can make up to eleven tricks (+450 is a shared top).

 
5
N-S
North
N
North
Q9
Q108
K1097
9642
 
W
West
AKJ7
AK52
632
J10
A
E
East
106543
J73
5
KQ87
 
S
South
82
964
AQJ84
A53
 

 

 

Board 6.

Doubling was the winner (+300 for an unshared top).

 
6
E-W
East
N
North
842
J97
Q972
A84
 
W
West
KQ105
KQ83
J54
97
9
E
East
J93
A1052
A106
1062
 
S
South
A76
64
K83
KQJ53
 

 

 

Board 11.

5 was the winner .  (Well-timed overcall, pard!)  The opponents chose to double 5 rather than bid on to 5 .  (Whether 5X goes for -100 or -300  — depending upon declarer’s ability to guess the clubs –, it scores more than 90% of the mps).

 
11
None
South
N
North
AKQ9654
A
82
1085
 
W
West
3
J962
J975
AJ64
J
E
East
82
KQ10543
K
K932
 
S
South
J107
87
AQ10643
Q7
 

 

 

Board 14. 

Doubling was the winner (+500 for an unshared top), as partner shows up with a ton of defensive values.

 
14
None
East
N
North
AQJ5
Q95
Q108
KQJ
 
W
West
9
A763
AK73
9876
9
E
East
K108732
K2
96
A32
 
S
South
64
J1084
J542
1054
 

 

 

Board 20. 

Raising to 4 was the winner on the 52-card layout.  (+170 is a 23% board; + 620 is a 64% board.)

 
20
Both
West
N
North
J76
63
KJ64
KQ43
 
W
West
Q4
Q109852
852
87
K
E
East
A852
AKJ4
Q7
AJ9
 
S
South
K1093
7
A1093
10652
 

 

How did you do?

 

 

 

 

 


1 Comment

Lucinda S.April 17th, 2017 at 12:28 am

Great blog, Jeff. These are the hands that keep me up at night when I make the wrong choice.

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